Former Captain George’s GM faces assault charge for behavior with employee

By on October 1, 2019

(CriShaun Eugene Hardy)

Bambos Charalambous, a Kill Devil Hills resident and former general manager of Capt. George’s Seafood Buffet, has been charged with simple assault in connection with an Aug. 2018 incident in the restaurant when he allegedly assaulted a female employee by forcibly hugging and kissing her.

Charalambous’s case is now scheduled for Dare County District Court on Oct. 29.  It was continued last week at his request due to a family emergency, according to Dare County Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Bland, who has been leading the investigation.

As part of the July 19, 2019 criminal summons, the employee’s statement details the Aug. 31, 2018 incident in which she alleges that Charalambous approached her at work, complimented her on her physical appearance, and held her in an embrace. “He kept hugging me and would not let me out of his embrace,” she said in the statement. “Then he spoke to me and I looked up and he planted a kiss on my lips…He then did it again and at this point I escaped his embrace and put myself in the other office.”

“I remember being shocked and disgusted,” the statement continued. “I felt very used and could not fathom what just occurred.”

The Voice, like a number of other news organizations, adheres to a policy of not naming the victim or alleged victim of sexual harassment or assault unless he or she chooses to be publicly identified.

Charalambous’s attorney, Dan Merrell, denied the charges against his client in a telephone interview with the Voice.

“These charges are totally false,” Merrell said. “Mr. Bambos hasn’t assaulted anyone…There has been no harmful or offensive touching.” Merrell, who said Charalambous is out of the country due to the recent death of his mother, also said that his client’s character and reputation in the community speak for itself. “Mr. Bambos has a very strong reputation in the community,” he said.

Sources say that Charalambous was dismissed from Captain George’s earlier this summer, however the restaurant’s Virginia Beach corporate office declined to comment on the status of his employment. “We are not at liberty to discuss any past or present employees,” Director of Guest and Employee Relations Lisa Crain said in an email.

In an interview, the employee who filed the complaint said the company was supportive of her in the aftermath of the incident.

The charge of simple assault is a Class 2 misdemeanor in North Carolina, according to Dare County Assistant District Attorney Jeff Cruden. A simple assault conviction carries a maximum punishment of 60 days in jail and a $1,000 fine. Without a prior record, Cruden said the charge carries a maximum punishment of probation and fines.

Charalambous serves on the Outer Banks Tourism Board. He is a former member of the Outer Banks Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. He served as general manager of the 500-seat Captain George’s restaurant that first opened its doors in Kill Devil Hills in 2009.

Owned by George and Sherry Pitsilides, Captain George’s also has restaurants in Williamsburg, VA., Myrtle Beach, SC and in its flagship location in Virginia Beach.

 

 

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Comments

  • Sand Flea

    “The Voice, like a number of other news organizations, adheres to a policy of not naming the victim or alleged victim of sexual harassment or assault unless he or she chooses to be publicly identified.”
    In America, we are presumed innocent until proven guilty. If it is found out that this is a false accusation, then an innocent person’s name has been publicly sullied. Why is it ok to publish this persons name when he hasn’t even gone thru his due process?

    Thursday, Oct 3 @ 5:14 pm
  • Mark Jurkowitz

    The presumption of innocence does apply in the U.S., but so does the journalistic standard of naming someone who has been charged with a crime. If that wasn’t the case, the public would never know the identity of people arrested for murder, grand larceny, drug trafficking, kidnapping, etc. until they were proven guilty at a trial or pleaded guilty. At the same time, once the suspect has been named, the press has an obligation to follow the case through to its completion.

    Friday, Oct 4 @ 9:41 am
  • Sand Flea

    And if this is found to be a false accusation, the public would never know the identity of an extortionist on the loose moving on to their next potential victim.

    Saturday, Oct 5 @ 10:37 am
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