Woman dies after being rescued Friday from rip current off Duck

By on July 17, 2018

‘Dangerous current’ flags are posted to alert swimmers when there is an elevated risk of rip currents. (KDH Ocean Rescue/Facebook)

A visitor who was caught in a rip current and rescued from the surf off Duck has died, and is the sixth person to perish this season after a swimming-related incident along the Outer Banks.

The woman was among a group of swimmers rescued by lifeguards near Bayberry Drive on Friday around 2:50 p.m.

She was flown to Sentara Norfolk General Hospital, where she died on Sunday, according to Town of Duck director of public information Christian Legner.

Advertisement

The identity and hometown of the victim has not been released.

The National Weather Service had posted a high risk of rip currents for Friday, due to the combination of a King Tide and long-period swell from the offshore remnants of Beryl.

Legner said conditions were changing rapidly at the time of the incident, and that lifeguards were trying to advise beachgoers to stay out of the ocean.

RELATED: Dare County launches text alert system for beach conditions »

Calls about multiple persons being pulled out by rip currents were dispatched Friday afternoon by Dare Central Communications in Duck, Southern Shores and South Nags Head.

Numerous rescues of swimmers were reported Thursday off Rodanthe, Waves and Salvo.

Advertisement

Five of the other deaths this season were all men between the ages of 48 and 79, with four in the waters off Cape Hatteras National Seashore. All but one of the deaths have been directly attributed to the victim being caught in rip currents.

A moderate risk of rip currents is forecast for today along the Outer Banks, when many rip current-related incidents have happened in the past.

While rip currents can happen at anytime, they are most prominent in the hours before and after low tide, which will be at 7:03 p.m. Tuesday at Oregon Inlet.

Advertisement

To access the updated beach forecast from the National Weather Service, visit www.weather.gov/beach/mhx and click on the umbrella for your area.

Recent posts in this category