Less than a mile left for Kitty Hawk beach nourishment project

By on September 6, 2017

Work has moved south of Balchen. (Town of Kitty Hawk)

Kitty Hawk officials said Tuesday there is less than one mile left to complete the nourishment project, with the most vulnerable stretch of beach in the town remaining.

Great Lakes Dock and Dredge has relocated the subline from the Luke and Bennett streets area to just south of Balchen Street, according to an e-mail from town management assistant Melody Clopton.

It is expected that they will continue pumping south from the Balchen Street subline and then switch to the pipe at Lillian Street at a later date to complete the project.

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The active construction area is currently between 4213 and 4239 North Virginia Dare Trail, around milepost 3.5.

All beach accesses remain open and pedestrians are able to access the nearest open beach by walking along the crest of the dune when necessary.

Clopton said Great Lakes has a storm contingency plan in place and they continue to monitor Hurricane Irma.

Kitty Hawk is the last of the four towns involved in the project, which started in late May and pumped sand onto 8 miles of beach at a cost of $38.5 million. Beaches were also widened in Kill Devil Hills, a small portion of Southern Shores and part of Duck.

Nags Head plans to re-nourish 10 miles of its beach next year. It first project was finished in 2011, just before the arrival of Hurricane Irene.

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The next public meeting about the project will be on Wednesday, September 13, at 1:00 p.m. at Kitty Hawk Town Hall. Contractors and engineers will be onsite to discuss the project and answer questions.

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Comments

Donny

September 8, 2017 11:06 am

I’m very happy with the way this project has turned out! I can’t wait until they finish Kitty Hawk – especially around MilePost 4 – and for this Fall Sprigging Season! Keep up the good work, Dare County!

Love a natural beach

September 7, 2017 7:18 pm

Salty, one half the Duck project hasn’t washed away. It’s simply out in the water in the imaginary sand box like all the sand in Nags Head. Don’t worry, everyone’s safe as long as they keep paying that sand tax.

Salty

September 7, 2017 7:20 am

Half of the Duck project has already eroded away. We won’t see that story on the “Voice.”

Chris

September 6, 2017 11:22 pm

Oceanfront home owners are being taxed 33 cent per $100 of value. Everyone else is 3 cent per 100. Supposed to be for 5 years only????

Love a natural beach

September 6, 2017 6:01 pm

How can Nags Head re-nourish 20 miles of its beach when they only nourished slightly under 10 miles to begin with? Leave it to the Voice to get its numbers mixed up. Fact check, please.

Janet Dawson

September 6, 2017 11:01 am

So glad to hear this is almost done . Our family loves the Outer banks . I’m praying that Irma doesn’t come up the east coast . Our family would love to someday move to the Outer banks . We’re praying that if it’s Gods will he will help us fine away . Kitty Hawk is one the places we love .

Woody

September 6, 2017 10:28 am

In looking at the project this weekend it looks like Kitty Hawk got a lot more beach out of the deal than we did at the 5 1/4 mp. KH beaches a lot wider and sand is a lot cleaner.

surf123

September 6, 2017 9:16 am

Looks good, but it is only a band-aid. Could easily be back to what it was this spring in a few storms. As I have said before it is categorically unfair as it directly benefits and rewards the oceanfront homeowners. Now that we have started pumping sand we will never be able to stop until we taxed everyone to the point they cannot take it anymore. Residents and non-resident homeowners will see an uptick in the tax rate after we have taxed visitors to the point they go somewhere else. If the plan is to continue to pummel visitors with the occupancy tax then 100% of it should go towards sand.

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