New wave of post-Irene mosquitoes hatches

By on September 13, 2011

Mosquitoes can breed in trash. (CDC)

Recent aerial spraying aimed at knocking down an exploding mosquito population after Hurricane Irene “helped for a few days,” Dare County Vector Control Supervisor Carl Walker says.

But the problem is back again.

“We had another hatch come out in the last day or two,” he said Monday.

In response to the newest generation of mosquitoes, the county will send out trucks to spray nightly. Depending on the weather, the vehicles will spray five to seven nights a week, starting between 7 and 7:30 p.m., he said.

Because mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water, the county is spraying ditches and other nonmoving waters with a mixture that kills the larvae, he said, noting that the solution is not detrimental to the overall water quality.

The county hired two planes, one out of Florida and one from Mississippi, to spray over the county, with the exceptions of state and federal lands. The county has asked for permission to spray over the state and federal lands, which contain swamps – some of the best mosquito breeding grounds – but it hasn’t been granted, either for the vehicles or for the planes, Walker said.

Aerial spraying started last Thursday, but was suspended after two hours because of weather conditions. It resumed Friday night, Sept. 9.

The county hopes to get another aerial spray set up soon, Walker said, but is unsure when or if that will take place.

In the meantime, Dare County residents should continue to dump out any standing water that may be in containers around the yard.

If you see the vehicles coming down the street in the evening to spray, Walker advised going into the backyard or inside, because “if we see you standing in the yard, we’ll turn the sprayer off,” and “we are trying to get everything sprayed.”

The vehicles do not spray on U.S. 264 or U.S. 158; most of the territory they cover is county property, he said.

There are no hopes of completely beating out the mosquito problem.

“Hopefully soon we’ll get some cooler weather,” Walker said. “That will slow them down.”

For more information, click to www.darenc.org.

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Comments

ekim

September 17, 2011 2:38 pm

IF the EPA&FDA would get out of the way an let them use some real BUG SPRAY an spry the fedral land this wouldnt be a problem! ( ps the cold front is here,this warm rain aint gona help sept17).

grantma

September 17, 2011 12:06 am

We get attacked getting into the car leaving Diamond Shoals and upon getting out of the car returning to Diamond Shoals. Gotta believe Diamond Shoals got MORE mosquitoes than other parts of Dare County. Hope the cooler temperatures expected this weekend will help. We really had to think hard and long before venturing out of the unit. Those mosquitoes’ attacks are NASTY.

grantma

September 17, 2011 12:02 am

Renting in South Nags Head. The local is correct. Husband, I, and friends have been ATTACKED by mosquitoes day in day out here at Diamond Shoals. ATTACKED. Get attacked as soon as we leave the rental unit and, also, as soon as we get out of the car. It is GROSS.

johnr

September 14, 2011 4:45 pm

Why, when they aerial-sprayed, didn’t they use pesticides that killed BOTH larvae and hatched mosquitos??? WHY???

Matt

September 14, 2011 4:01 pm

I agree, and I am not an expert, but the Colington sprayer seems to be going a tad fast in my opinion. We can almost hear the mosquitoes laughing at us back there as they dine and spread west nile!

A Local

September 14, 2011 3:32 pm

Hit us again. We’re dying in South Nags Head. One landed in my eyeball last night! My arms and legs look like I have Chicken Pox. The poor tourist have to stay in thier houses or get eaten alive.

Barbara

September 14, 2011 11:35 am

It might help if the trucks slowed down a bit. The guy doing Colington is merely spraying the street at 30mph.

Tom

September 14, 2011 5:23 am

Without Fed permission,their dove sized skeeters will migrate over to Dare County,s sprayer areas and fill in for the fallen comrades/

Cris C

September 13, 2011 10:33 pm

Why didnt they hire local planes that spray the crops to spray for mosquitos? Everybody INSIDE for 30 minutes !!!!!!

ekim

September 13, 2011 8:04 pm

Cold front! IT needs to be 30 DEGREES ASK ANY HUNTER, LETS GET REAL! THE SKEETERS BLACK FLIES GREEN HEADS AN YELLOW FLIES,THE NO SEES BLACK NATS MILL BE HERE until then. I love this swamp.

Toni

September 13, 2011 5:55 pm

Hope the cooler weather comes in like you said Adam, we definitely need it. Talking to a visitor in the grocery store the other week and she couldnt believe how bad they were said she was outside like two minutes and counted 12 bites. Personally Im tired of itching and would love some cooler weather.

Ed

September 13, 2011 5:28 pm

When you’re trying your hardest to make things right on your own, our government cops out! This is something they should not have had to review, but let happen, because it’s necessary. May the flees of a thousand camels infest their armpits! Git ‘er done!!

Bubba

September 13, 2011 2:06 pm

I bet the spraying is going to have to be done every few days till the skeeters are reproducing.

Adam

September 13, 2011 12:05 pm

There’s a nice, windy cold front coming later in the week.

Jimmmy C

September 13, 2011 11:41 am

Thanks to Tom Thumb(AKA Carl) & his crew for all the hard work. To those who oppose the spraying go to Stumpy Point & help those folks over there.Better take a mask tho so the mosquitos don’t choke you as they swarm

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